musicazzotto nell’orecchio: giugno

SAO PAULO, BRAZIL - MARCH 25: Tim Armstrong member of the band Rancid performs live on stage at Autodromo de Interlagos on March 25, 2017 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. (Photo by Mauricio Santana/Getty Images)

The first pick of June is “Deep Dreams”, the first full-length album by Daddy Issues. The Nashville based trio, challenges the clichés of rock music, feminism, and even taboo subjects with directness and grace. “Deep Dreams” is a captivating album, where sludgy grunge and melodic cues from indie pop are blended with great skill and bluntness. When singer and guitarist Jenna Moynihan saw the phrase “Daddy Issues” scribbled on a bathroom wall, she mistakenly assumed it was the name of a punk band destined to be her next favourite one. Upon realizing that no such band existed, Moynihan and her friends Emily Maxwell (drums) and Jenna Mitchell (bass) picked up their instruments, taught themselves how to play and started their own band. Lyrics focus on introspection and regret and, over the course of the album, Moynihan calls herself lots of things: sour, stupid, unimportant, a bummer, a “motel” for guys, a bad guitarist and so on. Since she appears to be a smart young woman, we guess life has not treated her very well and we hope she will be able to overcome another delusion when “Deep Dreams” will not climb the sales charts as it deserves. Hold on, Jenna: Musicazzotto Nellorecchio loves you, and also our readers will appreciate your music when they’ll listen to “In your head”, both in the “official audio” version and in “naked” peel session one at Paste Studios

Undoubtedly, “Deep Dreams” is often too rough to be immediately appealing to the large public, but it has a generous heart where rock burns with true, unquenchable fire and where frustrated anger opens the way to dirty sarcasm and apathy: a mental alchemy which seems to be ideal for composing dirty, lo-fi sounding tunes that stick to your subconscious. ‘Couse if your self-esteem is low and you are completely fucking around, is there anything else which could give your life some hope but independent rock music? (rating: 4 stars out of 5)

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The second “obvious” pick of the month is “Trouble Maker” by Rancid, the American punk rock band formed in Berkeley, California in 1991. Over their 26-year veteran career, Rancid remained signed to the independent label Epitaph, and connected to its underground roots, so that you can easily understand the reason why this band will always be underrated by music magazines (who, on the contrary, hail every album by Radiohead, Coldplay or Arcade Fire as a miracle). “Trouble Maker”, their ninth studio album isn’t going to change that and it’s really a shame because it’s a catchy album with as much as 19 songs on it!! 19 songs?!?!? Isn’t it quite foolish, since any industry worker drone knows that you only get paid for 10?? So, why bother? Well, the only good answer is: because Rancid are grumpy punk bastards who are not “on the market” and can’t be bothered to go on tour to support a record, do press for it or get in step with whatever trends are happening in contemporary music. They have always been true to themselves and after 26 years of honourable work, they show the same tireless dedication to Punk rock (which of course it’s not just a genre or a “phase,” it’s a way of life). Moreover, “Trouble Maker” is surprisingly one of their best album ever, and can hold a candle to “Let’s Go” (1994). Alright, cut the chatter, folks: it’s time to listen to Rancid.

Look at their horrible, ugly and disgusting faces: pure punk wildlife. Who could reasonably doubt that they do not care a whit about market share, EDM remixers or having annoying YouTube stars and/or rappers guest on their sessions?

In conclusion, “Trouble Maker” may be irrelevant in terms of novelty, but that doesn’t make the album any less good. Clash, Bad Religion, Sex Pistols, Husker Du, and Ramones are still alive in Rancid music, a band who have never been in step with anything, but keeps coming up with new punk rock masterpieces. And, of course, “this is not the end”… (rating: 4 stars out of 5)

3 Comments on "musicazzotto nell’orecchio: giugno"

  1. Lots of energy from the breathy, fiercely independent Rancid (my understanding is that there actually 19 tracks and not 17 in this new album). I also enjoyed Ghost of a Chance on Youtube. Great stuff from the Daddy Issues too. Thanks!

  2. hai ragione!! ho ricontrollato: i brani sono 19 e non 17 (ora correggo). che aggiungere? che i Rancid non avendo grosse case discografiche o grandi network commerciali alle spalle, sono l’antistress preferito da moltitudini di pseudocritici musicali frustrati per fare auto-psicoterapia dando libero sfogo ai loro più bassi istinti di superiorità. in giro ho letto recensioni a dir poco pretestuose e irritanti… ma l’album l’avranno ascoltato davvero? bah, e d’altro canto, cosa vuoi, fa così *fiiiigo* stroncare qualcuno e con i Rancid non c’è il rischio di incorrere in ritorsioni pubblicitarie da parte delle major. se poi aggiungi che pure i critichini indipendenti, per sentirsi un po’ più criticoni, spesso e volentieri scimmiottano i trendsetters dei big music magazines, ecco che la frittata è fatta. vabbè…
    cheddici, il musicazzotto può stare anche senza traduzione italiana? è che lunedì ho discusso con un eurofanatico cosmopolita progressista nostrano e poi alla fine è venuto fuori che non sa neanche l’ingleseeeeeee!!! confesso che mi son girati a trottola gli zebedoni e mi son detto “ah sì?” e in un moto di stizza/ripicca assolutamente sconclusionata contro il mondo tutto ho cassato la parte in italiano (avrei voluto scriverlo in tedesco, ma non sono abbastanza Kommunistische Internationale al soldo del grande capitale).
    : )))

  3. Infatti, ho pensato a una svolta della rubrica (da qui il mio commento in inglese), come dire: sicuramente chi segue questa musica conosce l’inglese o l’ha imparato per poterla seguire. E comunque anche i meno giovani hanno oramai scoperto Google. Translate, che, a parte le inevitabili cantonate surreali, sembra sia diventato più affidabile. Vogliamo metterlo alla prova? Ecco come ha tradotto il primo capoverso: “Senza dubbio, “Deep Dreams” è spesso troppo difficile per essere immediatamente attratto dal grande pubblico, ma ha un cuore generoso dove le rocce si bruciano con un vero e inconfondibile fuoco e dove la rabbia frustrata apre la strada a sporco sarcasmo e apatia: un’alchimia mentale che Sembra essere l’ideale per la composizione di melodie sporche, che suonano al tuo subconscio. “Cosa se la tua autostima è bassa e tu sei completamente cazzo, c’è qualcos’altro che potrebbe dare alla tua vita qualche speranza, ma la musica rock indipendente? (Valutazione: 4 stelle su 5)”
    :-)))

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